Wall Street Journal Profiles The Good Shufu

BN-LH212_japanb_G_20151116155444This weekend, one of the most thoughtful explorations  yet of The Good Shufu appeared in the Wall Street Journal’s Expat Blog by writer Debra Bruno. What I love most about Bruno’s interview is how it captured so many of the nuances and complications of both expat life and multicultural, multilingual love + marriage.

WSJ writes,

Author Tracy Slater, an American writer and academic who fell in love with a Japanese man, married him, and now lives with him and their daughter in Japan, describes her journey in a new book, “The Good Shufu: Finding Love, Life and Home on the Far Side of the World.” (Shufu means “housewife” in Japanese.)

The book is a warts-and-all account of how Ms. Slater, 48, who had barely traveled outside the U.S. when she first visited Japan to teach business English, fell in love with an Osaka salaryman, adjusted to a new culture, made the tough decision to give up her life in Boston, and spent years helping to care for an ailing father-in-law and trying to have a child in her 40s.

Ms. Slater chatted with WSJ Expat about the complications of being a western woman married to an Asian man, why she never really became fluent in Japanese, and how she struggled to keep her sense of self in Japan. An edited conversation follows.

See the full interview here. And thanks, WSJ!

My Father-in-Law Made Me the Mother I Am

BC-Logo_SquareSo happy & honored to have this piece up on Brain, Child Magazine‘s homepage. It’s about how caring for my beloved father-in-law as he died made me both a sadder and a bigger person, about how he “convinced me I could care for a child, that I’d grown big enough in the shadow of his decline to be a mother.”

It begins:

My Father-in-Law Made Me the Mother I Am

By the time I married my husband, I’d already fallen in love with my father-in-law too. Not in any weird way, but alongside all the passion and love for my husband was a deep affection for the man he lived with, the man he called Otousan.

My husband, Toru, is Japanese, and in Japan, it’s not uncommon for people to live with their parents until they marry. Toru was chonan, the oldest son, the one who should care for his parents as they age. When Toru’s mother died in a car accident, he left his company-backed MBA program at the university in Boston where I taught writing, and he moved back to Osaka. Soon after, I went too.

We moved into an apartment a few blocks from Otousan’s. Most nights, I’d cook dinner either at our place or Otousan’s, and we’d all eat together. My father-in-law spoke little English, and like many older Japanese men, he wasn’t what you’d call a loquacious fellow. But in between his silent welcoming of me as family in a country where marriage to foreigners can spell shame; his kind laugh at my dismal attempts to learn his language; and his grateful head-dips towards the tea I poured him after every meal, I grew to love him.

I may have loved my father-in-law, but I was terrified of having his grandchildren—or any child, for that matter. Not because of who or how Otousan was, but simply because having children is terrifying if you go into it with eyes-wide-open. At age 40, the year Toru and I wed, my eyes were pretty wide open.

I knew it was a myth that every mother bonds easily with her baby. I knew people who’d never bonded with their child, and one who said that, if she had to do it all again, she might choose not to procreate at all. I could imagine becoming one of these mothers.

Read the full piece at Brain, Child Magazine online,

Japan’s AERA magazine profiles The Good Shufu, saying…OK, I have no idea.

Japan’s AERA Magazine says….well, actually, I have no idea what they say. But I’m thankful for their profile of The Good Shufu (I think). Bonus points for anyone who can translate enough to summarize the article and let us know what it says!

The shogun was particularly unhelpful with this one. His insight was that it says “something about love and your book.” Oy.

AERA article

See the article online @ http://dot.asahi.com/aera/2015110400088.html

Are You an Expat Interested in Publishing Your Story?

Last week, I had the pleasure of joining the award-winning poet Jessica Goodfellow at the Japan Writers Conference 2015 to discuss writing and publishing as an expat, comparing my experience publishing with a Big Five press versus hers bringing out books with various small and indie presses.

We talked about what we learned from our own recent book publication journeys, covering ways of making necessary industry contacts (including agents and publishers), connecting with potential readers, types of publishing models prevalent in different genres, and more.

One other topic we discussed: the importance of supporting other writers, especially as an expat. In the spirit of this camaraderie, please feel free to get in touch if you’re interested in our list of almost 100 resources and tips that we handed out about increasing your chances of getting noticed by presses big and small. There’s a private, protected form you can use to contact me here, and I’ll be happy to send them along.

Oh, and also in the spirit of expat camaraderie, here’s a picture of me, Jessica, and our lovely friend Lisa (both of whom make repeated cameos in The Good Shufu, by the way!) sharing some bubbles post-conference.

PostJWCBubbles

“The Good Shufu” Hangs with Marie Kondo’s “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up”

A friend just snapped this picture for me in the Kinokuniya bookstore in Tokyo’s Shibuya neighborhood. Fun to be hanging with the best-sellers like Marie Kondo’s The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up & Matt Goulding’s Rice, Noodles, Fish! Although let’s be honest: Their books are truly about being a good cleaner and/or culinary expert, while mine offers a, let’s say, more ironic approach to tidying and cooking.

The Good Shufu @ Tokyo's Kinokuniya Books