It’s the Tokyo Book Launch Bash for The Good Shufu!

September 27, 2015 | The Pink Cow | Roppongi

For the Tokyo celebration of the launch of The Good Shufu, join four gaijin-wife authors as they read a bit from their work, toast the launch of their new books, and make a little merry, in this special Four Stories Tokyo event, “Married to the Mob: Four Writers on Love, Travel & Life as a Gaijin Wife”! Featuring:

Plus guest host Barry Lancet, mystery writer & author of Tokyo Kill (Simon & Schuster), finalist for the Shamus Award!

Free for entry, and featuring the usual mingling, eating, and drinking–plus the Four Stories style of intellectual inquiry: Ask the best question, win a free drink! Plus, there will be book giveaways of each author’s new book!

Sunday, September 27
5-7pm, with music & open mic to follow!
The Pink Cow
5-5-1 Roppongi
Roi Bulding, B1F
Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
03-6434-5773

Boston Globe features The Good Shufu in their “Story Behind the Book” column

Thanks, Boston Globe, for this piece!

Tracy Slater and the journey least expected

Before she met her husband, Tracy Slater was “fiercely independent,” she says, an academic teaching literature and gender studies at Boston University’s College Behind Bars program. Then a Japanese businessman getting an executive MBA in Boston entered her life, she said, “and I just fell madly in love with him.”

When her future husband had to return to Osaka to care for his father in the wake of his mother’s sudden death, Slater found herself following him there. They married, and she became, suddenly, a shufu. The word means “housewife” in Japanese, but it doesn’t share the connotations most Americans bring to the word here. “It’s much more common in Japan,” Slater said, “that when a woman marries she quits her job, even if she doesn’t have kids.”

In “The Good Shufu: Finding Love, Self, and Home on the Far Side of the World,” Slater writes of her cultural dislocation in this new country and new role, but also of the joy it brought her.

“I worked really hard to plan this kind of life I thought would be my perfect life, and it got completely upended when I fell in love with this person,” she said. She added, “The most rewarding thing is realizing I feel more grounded, more in the right place, than I ever have in my life. The journey that I least expected took me to exactly the right place.”

One place it took her was to motherhood, as parent to a half-Japanese daughter. “She is part of my body,” Slater said, “and yet she is also an integral part of a culture that will, always and forever, see me as a foreigner.” As for her role as shufu, she said, “The title is ironic. I’m not a good shufu. I’m the worst housekeeper in the world.”

Slater will read Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Newtonville Books.

See full piece online

Panic, Book Launches, & Being a Japanese-Jewish Housewife

A few new pieces came out recently in preparation for the book launch, which is now less than 2 weeks away. (Yikes.)

The first is from SheWrites, titled “The Silly Little Things I’m Panicking About” before the book launch. The second is a piece on the website Kveller, titled “Becoming a Japanese Housewife Made Me a More Committed Jew.”

Now that I see the two pieces and their titles side by side, it occurs to me: Perhaps I should actually be panicking less about the launch and more about how in the world I became a Japanese Jewish Housewife?