Calling Japan Writers, Readers & Lit Lovers!

Please join us at the only all-English official event at the 2016 Tokyo International Literary Festival! Plus, we’ve got this swanky poster…

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More info is here!

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The Good Shufu Does the Tokyo International Literary Festival

Thrilled to be a featured author at:

The 2016 Tokyo International Literary Festival | March 4 | Sophia University | Tokyo, Japan

As part of the event Four Stories at the 2016 Tokyo International Literary Festival, I’ll be reading from The Good Shufu along with three other acclaimed expat authors (TBA), for an evening of stories, discussion, and mingling.

Friday, March 4, 2016
6-8pm, with mingling and drinks with the authors to follow
Sophia University, Yotsuya Campus
Building 12
Room 502
7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 102-8554

More info coming soon!

The Trailing Spouse’s Guide to Surviving Expat Re-entry

Fun having this piece on trailing spouses, accidental expats, and re-entry blues in the Wall Street Journal‘s Expat Blog today, co-authored with a new friend who is a military spouse based in Tokyo, the blogger Susan Dalzell. In it, we give a series of tips for surviving the dreaded “re-entry” phase back into your expat country after even a short trip home.

We start,

For those of us who are trailing spouses or “accidental expats”—drawn abroad not necessarily for our own careers or sense of wanderlust but for a partner’s job, family or nationality—global life presents unique challenges and sacrifices. Western culture in particular glamorizes expatriate existence, suggesting a life of global travel, international panache, and a social circle of like-minded explorers: a slightly more multicultural, perhaps sober, version of Hemingway and his brood.

Reality can hew a little rougher, though…

My favorite tip we include is this one, drawn in part from the struggles I explore and the lessons I learn in The Good Shufu:

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t always (or even ever) love your expat “home.” As a trailing spouse–especially if you’re married to someone from the country where you live–you may have asked yourself when you’re going to fall in love with your overseas home just as you once fell in love with the partner who brought you there. If you’ve recently been back to your native country, you may have heard friends and family comment on how exciting your expat life must be and how lucky you are to live abroad. But don’t let this guilt you into thinking you always–or frankly ever–have to love the land you’re in….As long as you’re fascinated by it, or even continually learning from it, you’ll have an expat life worth its weight in yen or euros or…

See our handful of other tips for surviving the re-entry blues in the full article at the Wall Street Journal online–and add some coping strategies of your own, if you have any new ones!

 

Japan’s AERA magazine profiles The Good Shufu, saying…OK, I have no idea.

Japan’s AERA Magazine says….well, actually, I have no idea what they say. But I’m thankful for their profile of The Good Shufu (I think). Bonus points for anyone who can translate enough to summarize the article and let us know what it says!

The shogun was particularly unhelpful with this one. His insight was that it says “something about love and your book.” Oy.

AERA article

See the article online @ http://dot.asahi.com/aera/2015110400088.html

Are You an Expat Interested in Publishing Your Story?

Last week, I had the pleasure of joining the award-winning poet Jessica Goodfellow at the Japan Writers Conference 2015 to discuss writing and publishing as an expat, comparing my experience publishing with a Big Five press versus hers bringing out books with various small and indie presses.

We talked about what we learned from our own recent book publication journeys, covering ways of making necessary industry contacts (including agents and publishers), connecting with potential readers, types of publishing models prevalent in different genres, and more.

One other topic we discussed: the importance of supporting other writers, especially as an expat. In the spirit of this camaraderie, please feel free to get in touch if you’re interested in our list of almost 100 resources and tips that we handed out about increasing your chances of getting noticed by presses big and small. There’s a private, protected form you can use to contact me here, and I’ll be happy to send them along.

Oh, and also in the spirit of expat camaraderie, here’s a picture of me, Jessica, and our lovely friend Lisa (both of whom make repeated cameos in The Good Shufu, by the way!) sharing some bubbles post-conference.

PostJWCBubbles

It’s the Tokyo Book Launch Bash for The Good Shufu!

September 27, 2015 | The Pink Cow | Roppongi

For the Tokyo celebration of the launch of The Good Shufu, join four gaijin-wife authors as they read a bit from their work, toast the launch of their new books, and make a little merry, in this special Four Stories Tokyo event, “Married to the Mob: Four Writers on Love, Travel & Life as a Gaijin Wife”! Featuring:

Plus guest host Barry Lancet, mystery writer & author of Tokyo Kill (Simon & Schuster), finalist for the Shamus Award!

Free for entry, and featuring the usual mingling, eating, and drinking–plus the Four Stories style of intellectual inquiry: Ask the best question, win a free drink! Plus, there will be book giveaways of each author’s new book!

Sunday, September 27
5-7pm, with music & open mic to follow!
The Pink Cow
5-5-1 Roppongi
Roi Bulding, B1F
Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032
03-6434-5773

Feel Like Im Having My 15 Seconds of Travel Cool

2015-08-10 13:18:53 +00001Meet my new BFF, Nat. As in Nat Geo. As in National Geographic Traveler, who in their August/September 2015 issue has chosen The Good Shufu for the Travel Inspiration: Great New Reads.

They write,

Thirty-six-year-old “confirmed Bostonian” Tracy Slater ventures to Japan to teach English and falls in love with a 31-year-old Osaka salaryman. She weds him, becomes an ambivalent shufu, or housewife, and concocts this moving cross-cultural memoir.

I have to admit, I’m feeling very worldly right now. At least for today…

2015-08-10 13:18:22 +00001

Boston Globe Reviews The Good Shufu!

It’s a thrill to see my hometown paper review my book about finding new homes without losing the old, noting its “heartbreaking, touching, and revelatory” scenes. They write, in part,

2015-07-19 18:52:07 +00001Tracy Slater’s memoir kicks off with this winning paragraph: “I met him in Kobe, Japan, in May 2004. Three weeks later, he told me he loved me. At least I thought that’s what he said.”

The author, known in the Boston area for creating the rollicking reading series Four Stories, traces her bicontinental romance as it unfolds over a decade, with flashbacks to her chaotic childhood in an upper-class Boston family. In this combination love story and travelogue, Slater exemplifies the adage: “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.”

See the full review here. And thanks, Boston Globe!

The Hardcover Hits Tokyo!

ShufuHardcoverJune2015The book exists in hardcover! Here it is on my windowsill at our house in the Tokyo suburbs. I may like my makeup sparkly & my patent leather shiny, but I’m loving the special matte paper Putnam Books has chosen. Thanks so much, Putnam!

PS. It’s not in bookstores in the US (or any other countries) yet until June 30, but it is being offered for pre-order at all of these sellers–and at a discount at many of them, until the book is actually released to the public!

B&N Officially Announces: Good Shufu is a Summer ’15 Discover Great New Writers Selection

Discover_Barnes_Noble_logo_050515So incredibly touched and honored by Barnes & Noble and their official announcement, through the publishing industry newsletter Shelf Awareness, of The Good Shufu as a Summer 2015 Discover Great New Writers Selection. They write,

The Good Shufu: Finding Love, Self, and Home on the Far Side of the World by Tracy Slater (Putnam, June 30). “Falling in love can be dizzying, dazzling, and disorienting all at once, but Tracy Slater took things one step farther when she fell in love with a Japanese businessman–whose English was on par with her Japanese–and upended her life as an academic in Boston to become a housewife in Osaka, Japan. Our readers are in love with this delightful, deft memoir about new beginnings and making one’s home.”

I’m also honored to share this distinction with the 11 other books and authors chosen, all listed here!